Home Technology News Top Asian News 2:34 a.m. GMT

Top Asian News 2:34 a.m. GMT

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SRINAGAR, India (AP) — One Indian soldier has been killed and at least two others wounded Sunday after rebels stormed a paramilitary camp in disputed Kashmir, officials said. At least two gunmen entered the camp near southern Lethpora village early Sunday firing guns and grenades at the sentry, said paramilitary spokesman Rajesh Yadav. He said soldiers inside the camp are responding to the attack. The initial assault left one paramilitary soldier dead and two wounded. Police said reinforcement of army soldiers and counterinsurgency police encircled the camp and were exchanging gunfire with the assailants. No rebel group fighting against Indian rule has immediately claimed responsibility for the attack.

THETKABYIN, Myanmar (AP) — In her dreams, Setara walks hand in hand with her Muslim husband through the streets of the seaside Myanmar town they grew up in. They visit old friends, share a meal with family, dip their toes into the warm surf of the Bay of Bengal. But in the hate-filled reality of the world they live in, Setara can only do these things alone — when she takes off her Islamic veil and crosses through a pair of checkpoints into the predominantly Buddhist state capital, where her government will not allow the love of her life to set foot.

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — North Korea said Saturday that it will never give up its nuclear weapons as long as the United States and its allies continue their “blackmail and war drills” at its doorstep. The North’s official Korean Central News Agency took the oft-repeated stance as it reviewed the country’s major nuclear weapons and missile tests this year. North Korea conducted its most powerful nuclear test to date in September and launched three intercontinental ballistic missiles into the sea in July and November, indicating that it is closer than ever to gaining a nuclear arsenal that could viably target the mainland United States.

PYONGYANG, North Korea (AP) — Kim Jong Un wants to turn the art of kimchi-making into a science. And the North Korean leader is putting his money where his mouth is. On the outskirts of Pyongyang, surrounded by snow-covered farms and greenhouses, stands one of Kim’s latest pet projects, the Ryugyong Kimchi Factory, which produces 4,200 tons of the iconic Korean pickled vegetable dish a year. The shiny new facility replaces an older factory and opened in June last year after getting Kim’s final seal of approval, according to manager Paek Mi Hye. The factory is intended to showcase Kim’s efforts to boost North Korea’s domestic economy and produce more, and better, consumer products.

WASHINGTON (AP) — In the first month of Donald Trump’s presidency, an American scholar quietly met with North Korean officials and relayed a message: The new administration in Washington appreciated an extended halt in the North’s nuclear and ballistic missile tests. It might just offer a ray of hope. North Korean officials responded defiantly. The nearly four-month period of quiet wasn’t a sign of conciliation, they retorted, insisting supreme leader Kim Jong Un would order tests whenever he wanted. As if to ram the point home, North Korea only two days later launched a new type of medium-range missile that ended Trump’s brief honeymoon.

MOSCOW (AP) — The Russian Foreign Ministry on Saturday denied claims that U.N. sanctions against North Korea had been breached by Russian tankers transferring fuel to North Korean tankers at sea. The statement came in response to a Reuters report citing unidentified Western European security sources who said the transfers took place in October and November and represented a breach of sanctions. The Russian Foreign Ministry said in a statement carried by Russian news agencies that Russia has “fully and strictly observed the sanctions regime.” The statement did not address whether or not Russian ships had transferred the fuel. It did say resolutions by the United Nations Security Council have imposed limits on North Korea’s refined oil imports but haven’t banned them altogether.

BRUSSELS (AP) — At least 81 reporters were killed doing their jobs this year, while violence and harassment against media staff has skyrocketed, the world’s biggest journalists’ organization says. In its annual “Kill Report,” seen by The Associated Press, the International Federation of Journalists said the reporters lost their lives in targeted killings, car bomb attacks and crossfire incidents around the world. More than 250 journalists were in prison in 2017. The number of deaths as of Dec. 29 was the lowest in a decade, down from 93 in 2016. The largest number were killed in Mexico, but many also died in conflict zones in Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria.

BEIJING (AP) — China on Friday denied violating U.N.-imposed limits on oil supplies to North Korea after U.S. President Donald Trump criticized Beijing for allowing oil to reach the North. Beijing has “completely and strictly” complied with sanctions meant to discourage leader Kim Jong Un’s government from pursuing nuclear and missile technology, said a foreign ministry spokeswoman, Hua Chunying. A South Korean newspaper said this week, citing unidentified officials, that ships believed to be Chinese transferred oil to North Korean vessels at sea. Trump said on Twitter he was “very disappointed that China is allowing oil to go into North Korea.” China is North Korea’s main trading partner and energy supplier.

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korea said Friday that it was holding a Hong Kong-flagged ship and its crew members for allegedly violating U.N. sanctions by transferring oil to a North Korean vessel in October. The Lighthouse Winmore is believed to have transferred about 600 tons of refined petroleum products to the North Korean ship, the Sam Jong 2, in international waters in the East China Sea on Oct. 19, after leaving the South Korean port of Yeosu, a South Korean Foreign Ministry official said. South Korean customs authorities boarded the ship and interviewed crew members after they returned to Yeosu on Nov.

KAYSERI, Turkey (AP) — Iminjin Qari felt upbeat as he drove to Istanbul’s airport with three empty buses and a simple task: pick up about 200 fellow Uighurs who had fled China for asylum in Turkey — and escort them to safety. Qari, a Uighur emigre and community worker, planned to take the newcomers back to the city of Kayseri, where the Turkish government had set aside empty apartments for their resettlement. As he approached the terminal, his heart sank. About 20 burly Uighurs were already there, greeting the refugees as they trickled out. They were recruiters for Islamic militant groups.



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